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Clothespins — Made in the USA

THE REAL DEAL.

These 3.5" clothespins might outlast you. Each one is hand crafted in Texas by folks who care how it functions. Doesn't matter whether you're hanging sheets in soft breezes or clipping the chip bag or bundling bills or crafting something clever, you'll want something sturdy that will stand the test of time—not some overseas knock off that splays sideways. Just holding one in your hand you know, it's the real deal, an often overlooked but highly functional tool for generations.

Each of these pins boasts
 full-coiled, stainless steel springs (also made in the USA) and hardwood ash lumber. You have your choice of natural no finish or a boiled linseed oil finish. Your call. 

The process of making Heritage clothespins goes something like this... after the lumber is purchased, there are 15 steps to complete each pin. Pins are then assembled and packaged... where they wait for you.

Before you gasp at the price, remember... each one is hand crafted in the USA to be sturdy and useful for generations. And nobody is getting rich off of them. Each one is worth the $2 she costs, we're just accustomed to smaller, cheap versions. But you can't hang grandma's quilt on the line with those.

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WHAT'S GOOD?

  • Made from ash trees
  • Hanging your laundry reduces our dependence on fossil fuels... and it smells so darn fresh
  • Boiled Linseed is totally non-toxic with no additives (finished version only)
  • Hand crafted in the USA using USA steel springs

WHAT DO THEY REPLACE?
Cheap knock offs from overseas made with low grade wood and springs. You need only pick up one of these to know the difference. It's heavier and the tension and strength of the grip is far superior. Seriously, try it. Each one is like a piece of art, a tool for generations to enjoy. 

SOURCE
Not only are these pins proudly Made in the USA, all of the stuff they're made out of is too.

The ash comes from Southern or lower Appalachian; Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, as it has a finer texture and machinability than its Northern counterpart. Southern Ash tends to run better for a more uniform white color with less of the brown heartwood, and typically has better widths and lengths due to a longer growing season. 

Fun Fact: The ash tree is a genus of flowering plants in the olive and lilac family and is valued for its high strength and resilience. Since it is low in naturally occurring tannins (a compound in lumber that can stain cloth), this set of clothespins is ideal for use on laundry. 

The springs are thick gauge, stainless steel made in New York State, which helps to hold the pins together and makes them last longer than the big box store clothespins.

ABOUT THE COMPANY

Heritage Clothespins is a home-based, family-run company making high quality clothespins. It was started in an effort to fill the void of quality clothespins available to consumers in the USA.  For much of clothespin history, the US has had a supply of quality clothespin makers, but like many industries, it became more cost effective to move production to other countries. This has left us with clothespins that are cheap in price, but results in a product of poor quality made from inferior materials that fall apart quickly.
Casey Schillinger, who does the majority of the work in the shop, grew up in the foothills of the Catskill Mountains in Walton, NY.  While there, during warmer months, he came to appreciate the crisp, clean smell of clothes dried outside on the line. Following high school, he received a Bachelor of Arts from Houghton College.  After that, he moved to Bradford, PA where he earned his Master of Arts from Saint Bonaventure University.  It was in Bradford that he met his lovely wife and learned to appreciate woodworking and hardwood lumber. In 2010, Casey and Ashley relocated to the Houston area for jobs and to be closer to family.  Casey has a passion for creating things with his hands. Never in a hurry, he enjoys the pace of slow and steady work that marks a skilled craftsman. While reading The Deliberate Agrarian blog, written by Herrick Kimball, Casey saw the Classic American Clothespins Mr. Kimball makes and thought this would be an enjoyable outlet for his woodworking passion so in the summer of 2014, he began the process of setting up Heritage Clothespins.